Pride in the Classroom EQUALS Pride on the Field #2

Grades matter. Being a conscientious student matters. In short, showing pride in the classroom is critical to the recruiting process.

As Yale University Coach Frawley notes below (in the Coach’s Corner), sometimes leading with your GPA may attract open doors to college as much as your batting average does.

Have you ever heard the following?

MYTH) It is better to make an ‘A’ in a non-AP class than a ‘B’ in an AP class

MYTH) My son goes to one of the best schools in the country, so colleges will understand a ‘C’ here or there isn’t so bad

MYTH) When the season starts, my son is going and going so it’s somewhat understandable that his grades may take a slight dip. Coaches will understand.

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Hmmm…Let’s break each of those statements down a little further

MYTH) It is better to make an ‘A’ in a non-AP class than a ‘B’ in an AP class.

Reality: It is better to make an ‘A’ in an AP class. While the weighting of the grade is equal, your admissions will be based, not only on your grades, but also on the rigors of your schedule. Chemistry is difficult for many…whether College Prep, Honors, or Advanced Placement. Work hard, study effectively, and accepting a grade other than your best should be unacceptable. Remember, it’s all about pride. Pride in the classroom equals pride on the field. SHOW PRIDE in all that you do.

MYTH) My son goes to one of the best schools in the country, so colleges will understand a ‘C’ here or there isn’t so bad.

Reality: A ‘C’ is a ‘C’. And every student-athlete cannot possibly go one of the best schools in the country. Let’s cover the second piece first. High Schools definitely have a ranking and reputation among college admissions departments. Really think your school is one of those? CLICK HERE to see latest rankings. And, while your school’s ranking could have a positive influence on the admissions decision, your actual grades and test scores will have a greater impact.

Let’s take a look at first part of that question…college will understand a ‘C’ since we are at a tough school. Well, it’s not a “we” are at a tough school. Your son (not mom or dad) attend the school. Most importantly, a ‘C’ is a ‘C’ and should be avoided at all costs. C’s are C’s. With effort and conscientiousness, C’s should NOT be a possibility for the student-athlete. It boils down to effort. Remember, it’s all about pride. Pride in the classroom equals pride on the field. SHOW PRIDE in all that you do.

MYTH) When season starts, my son is going and going so it’s somewhat understandable that his grades may take a slight dip. Coaches will understand.

Reality: No they will not. Short answer to that question is classwork and studying does not take a backseat to baseball when the season starts. It’s about Pride and Determination. Making an ‘A’ in class is the equivalent of coming up with a big hit in the game. Not doing well in a class is no different than failing to prepare for the big district game. Remember, it’s all about pride. Pride in the classroom equals pride on the field. SHOW PRIDE in all that you do.

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OKtobesmart

Recruiting is, at best, an inexact science. It is a formula based on metrics, factors within your control, uncontrollable variables, and a lot of personal preference. Control what you can Control: Work hard in the classroom. Sweat in the weight room. Excel on the ball field.

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Coach’s Corner

Coach’s Corner provides tips on the recruiting process from the viewpoint of the nation’s finest college coaches.

YALE

Coach’s Corner with:

TUCKER FRAWLEY – YALE UNIVERSITY ASSISTANT COACH & RECRUITING COORDINATOR (a reprint from Nov 2016)

“Most of the players I come across have dreams of their baseball abilities opening up academic or financial doors that otherwise wouldn’t have been possible. While that is true for many recruits and absolutely a dream worth pursuing, don’t underestimate how many baseball doors can be opened for you due to your academic credentials. You’d be surprised how many players – at all levels of college baseball – make their way onto a roster without an athletic scholarship because they garnered admission to a school on their own and earned a roster spot as a walk on. The toughest part of this process is getting your foot in the door and on a college roster. But it is also the least important part of the process when it comes to who earns at-bats or innings. The best players play regardless of how they got there. Keep all of those potential paths in mind throughout your college search and the more options you’ll inevitably have when it’s all said and done.”